Posts tagged ‘twitter’

February 4, 2011

Kenneth Cole Tweets

The end of the era I foretold a few posts ago isn’t here yet. And the past day has been a momentous one in Twitter affairs (Noam Chomsky won’t mind me borrowing his sentence).

It all started with the following remark tweeted by Kenneth Cole, the clothing retailer:

Millions are in uproar in #Cairo. Rumor is they heard our new spring collection is now available online at http://bit.ly/KCairo.

There was some uproar indeed but it came from the online community who was outraged by this callous tweet. Kenneth Cole was blamed for making light of a serious situation, exploiting current events and hijacking the #Cairo hash-tag, used to group Egypt-relevant tweets.

Kenneth Cole responded by deleting the tweet (bad move!) and publishing an apology on his Facebook page (smart move). I’m against deleting tweets because by the time one realizes they should be removed, they’ve already been re-tweeted by a bunch of people and, as such, will always remain on record anyway. This makes the deletion of tweets appear like an attempt to conceal things.

Lo and behold, a newcomer enters the Twitter scene less than an hour later. Behold KennethColePR – the impersonation account – and the following zingers:

Parents of Hiroshima — you’ll melt when you see our new kids collection! #KennethColeTweets

People of Australia: Water up to your ankles? We’ve got your Kenneth Cole capris right here! #KennethColeTweets

(there’s more where these came from.)

January 10, 2011

Finders, keepers

My friend Lama’s latest blog post, titled “The Death of the Retweet Button”, revealed a disturbing and frustrating phenomenon occurring in the Twittersphere: people taking credit for other people’s discoveries.

They would rather go through the tedious process of copying the entire tweet and placing it in their tweet box, then deleting all unnecessary crap that comes on there. Then, they write the magical “RT” right before it. That way, if anyone else liked the tweet, their name remains as tribute to their efforts of finding that valuable piece of info and sharing it with the rest of the world.

While I share Lama’s sentiment and strongly believe that credit should be given where it’s due, I find it amusing that our society has evolved to a point where finding the cool stuff is almost as important as creating it in the first place. Not sure why we’re wired to do this. I remember feeling very frustrated as a teenager because everyone believed my then-boyfriend discovered this really cool Pearl Jam song (clip posted below) that wasn’t on their main albums when, in fact, I (me, moi) was the one who found it (through another friend who found it through another friend) and introduced it to our group’s musical landscape.

Yes, the fact that I’m still stewing over this is beyond pathetic.
But it goes to show that people feel a sense of ownership over the things they find first.

I also remember my younger brother battling me ferociously – when we were kids and sometimes today – to be the first to tell our parents that a famous singer or actor passed away. Not sure why he takes so much pleasure out of delivering this type of news – let’s just call that his thing. (My husband might get mad at me if I don’t mention that HE discovered Tom Segura – dude in the link – first and introduced me to him.)

Could this visceral desire to be the first to find something be the source of hipster culture? Think about it.

Hipsters spend their time trying to out-obscure one another. Why? Because they’re so unique? Or because they’ve mastered the art of finders, keepers by running breathlessly down the least beaten path?

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January 3, 2011

The end of an era?

The New Year started with a bang by dealing a major blow to freedom of speech. While we all sleep soundly, one of the four pillars of Internet Fun is under threat of demolition.

“California’s SB 1411, which adds a layer of criminal and civil penalties for certain online impersonations” went into effect on January 1, 2011. Similar laws in other states will probably follow suit at some point.

While this may be a victory for high school kids who worry about bullies impersonating them online, it is painfully obvious that lawmakers overlooked the dramatic impact this piece of legislation would have on the Twittersphere.

Some of the most interesting and witty Twitter accounts are online impersonations. Here is a small sample of what SB 1411 threatens to TAKE AWAY from us:

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